Thursday, February 11, 2016

Cliven shouda stayed home

Cliven Bundy arrested in Portland as Oregon occupiers say they will surrender Thursday


Cliven Bundy, the controversial Nevada rancher at the center of an armed standoff with federal officials in 2014, was arrested in Portland Wednesday, according to jail records and news reports.
He was reportedly on his way to the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in isolated southeastern Oregon, where an armed occupation in its 41st day seemed to be coming to an end. The occupation had been organized by Bundy’s sons Ammon and Ryan, who are now in jail facing a felony charge of conspiracy to impede a federal officer.
The last remaining members of the occupation had said they will turn themselves over on Thursday morning, after the FBI appeared to close in on their encampment.
The FBI in Portland would not confirm the circumstances of elder Bundy’s arrest. But the Oregonian reported that he was apprehended at Portland International Airport after disembarking from his flight from Las Vegas late Wednesday night. The newspaper said that Bundy, 74, faces the same charge as his son in relation to his standoff with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in 2014. He also faces weapons charges, it said.

Bundy’s arrest came after federal authorities moved to surround the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Wednesday afternoon, prompting the lingering occupiers to have a panicked phone conversation with a few of their supporters, including Nevada state assemblywoman, Michele Fiore, that was broadcast over a livestream on YouTube
Initially the occupiers said they feared an armed assault by agents was imminent. But late Wednesday night local time, after a phone conversation that lasted more than four hours, one of occupiers said they planned to emerge from the refuge in the morning so long as Fiore was there to act as a witness and ensure that the occupation ended peacefully.
Mike Arnold, an attorney for Ammon Bundy who took part in Fiore’s phone negotiations and was en route to the wildlife refuge with her early Thursday, told The Washington Post that he was “extremely disappointed” by the news of Cliven Bundy’s arrest.
“It was a horrible strategic move to arrest Cliven while negotiations were literally happening over the phone,” he said. “That is not a symbol of good faith.”
But he believed that the agreement reached Wednesday night would still hold.


The government is still in control contrary to what some think. It will not tolerate insurrection. If these people want change they need to learn to work within the system

11 comments:

  1. I saw that and was gonna post it. Good work. This guy is such a bag of wind.

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    1. The USSR had nothing on the Feds. These protestor will be buried, long dead and gone, before we ever hear what happens in these "so called trials."

      Chalk another one up for the BLM. Soon they will be coming for your property. They won't be using eminent domain when they come. They'll be using guns like the ones they used to kill that rancher.

      They can't go after and deport illegals, but these big men can kill and imprison American citizens.

      Sam Adams is rolling over in his grave.

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    2. The "so called trials" will be held in open court, probably in Portland Oregon. The protesters were not on their property, they were on a federal wild life preserve, armed with weapons. They have violated federal laws and now will be prosecuted as all such criminals should be.

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    3. Let's just throw everyone in jail and be done with it.

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  2. Bundy was charged with conspiracy to commit an offense against the United States, assault on a federal law officer by use of a deadly and dangerous weapon, interference with commerce by extortion, and obstruction of justice. He was also charged with two counts of use and carry of a firearm in relation to a crime of violence, the complaint said.

    Cliven Bundy is scheduled to appear in federal court in Portland at 1:30 p.m. (4:30 p.m. ET), prosecutors said.

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    1. This country is done. Stick a fork in it.

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  3. The four holdouts in the armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon surrendered on Thursday with the last protester repeatedly threatening suicide during a dramatic final phone call with mediators before he gave up, ending the 41-day standoff.

    David Fry, 27, stayed behind for more than an hour and told supporters by phone he had not agreed with the other three to leave the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon. The call was broadcast live on an audio feed posted on the Internet.

    "I'm actually pointing a gun at my head. I'm tired of living," Fry said during the phone call. He later added, "Until you address my grievances, you're probably going to have to watch me be killed, or kill myself." Reuters News

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    1. When exactly will they address his grievances? A show trial in pinko Portland. As far as I know one rancher is dead. No Feds are dead. Let's just let this one slide right down with the rest of our country. Buried in a socialist progressive morass.

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  4. According to a 2012 Congressional Research Service report, the federal government owns roughly 635 million acres of the 2.27 billion acres in the U.S.

    When states have federal lands within their borders, those states can receive Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT), which are federal monies given to local governments as payment for property taxes lost to non-taxable federal lands, according to the U.S. Department of the Interior. In 2013, the states received roughly $400 million in PILT payments, up from the $393 million sent out in 2012.

    Seems there would be more concern in the west for the amount of Federal Land owned by the Federal Government as they own little in the east.

    Nevada Max is 84% Federal Land. My county 54% Federal Land. The sad part the National Forests are not managed and are now ravaged by the pine beetle with dead forests prime for forest fires as far as the eye can see.

    http://finance.townhall.com/columnists/nicksorrentino/2014/04/19/federal-land-as-a-percentage-of-total-state-land-area-n1826391

    Another example of government non management.

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    1. I disagree Louman. We have a very fine well managed National forest here that has become one of my favorite exercise venues because of it's sheer size and it's ruggedness. National Forests are managed differently. They are for the outdoor use by the people doing many things. Hiking camping 4 wheeling horseback riding and Louman there is more there then a few pine beetle ( by the way that is Hemlock woolly adelgid a European import that is eating the trees. Here in the east the damage is being contained by planting a disease resistant variety. I saw a whole hillside of them in the Smokies last fall. Anyway what makes the trees prone to this damage Louman? Ah......... Acid rain caused by coal fired power plants. In the National forests you are encouraged to roam wherever you want instead of staying on the beaten path. And if it was established there was a reason. I think it's great that the government actually makes up lost tax income to the states and locals for the land that it controls. It doesn't have to do the

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    2. Seeing the forests of Colorado, Wyoming, Montana destroyed as the forest service stood by and watched was sickening.

      Guess it was no big deal to the eastern part of the country as they were unaffected and it was only 20+ million acres of forest destroyed.

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